Let’s face it, we’re egoists. We don’t like each other, and even worse, we think there’s nothing wrong with it. We start measuring our attitude toward others from the zero point. That is, feeling indifference toward others is our starting point, our zero, and from there we begin to judge: If I have some affection toward another person, it’s considered good. If I dislike a person, it is considered bad.

We have entered a new phase in our development. The singular system that we all comprise has become so entwined that we can no longer remain neutral. …


Today, when we look at the world, we see only one force: egoism. We think that everything runs only according to everyone’s efforts to raise themselves to the top of the heap, to be the hunter and not the hunted, the predator and not the prey. We, humanity, have reached the top of the pyramid, and from the zenith, we’re trying to find what more we can take. To achieve this, we learn, become more sophisticated, and develop technology, science, social structures, and everything we have developed in order to succeed in this world.

This is the time to realize…


Tablets of the opioid-based Hydrocodone at a pharmacy in Portsmouth, Ohio, June 21, 2017. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston/File Photo

Long before the pandemic hit the world, the US was already on a downward trend. According to a story published by David Leonhardt in The New York Times under the title “Life Expectancy, Falling,” “During the second half of the 2010s, life expectancy [in the US] fell on a sustained basis for the first time since the fighting of World War II killed several hundred thousand Americans.” Echoing this topic, the magazine Science News stated in an essay titled “‘Deaths of despair’ are rising. It’s time to define despair,” that “Since the 1990s, mortality had risen sharply.” …


A woman wearing a mask passes by a coronavirus disease mobile testing van, as cases of the infectious Delta variant of COVID-19 continue to rise, in Washington Square Park in New York City, U.S., July 22, 2021. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid

Covid-19 has split the world between those who strongly support the need for massive vaccination to tackle the pandemic, and those who vehemently oppose mandatory inoculation and restrictions, taking to the streets of Europe and America to express their discontent. As the Delta variant spreads across the world, in the U.S. alone, an average of 43,000 new cases are reported every day, a 65% increase in one week. How can we ever exit the pandemic in such a divided scenario?

In every area and every situation in our lives, when we become more corrected, our world will also be more…


Which is stronger, the survival instinct or the hunting instinct? In the animal kingdom, this question is simple: The survival instinct overshadows all other instincts and fully dominates the behavior of animals. When there is a forest fire, natural enemies flee side by side and do not touch each other. Their survival instinct suppresses their hunting instincts and everyone understands that now is the time to run. The time for hunting will come only once the immediate danger is gone.

This callous exploitation is human nature, and the sooner we acknowledge it, the sooner we can begin to change it…


A few days ago, on July 19, the multinational consumer goods company Unilever, which is also the parent company of Ben & Jerry’s, announced that “it is inconsistent with [their] values for Ben & Jerry’s ice cream to be sold in the Occupied Palestinian Territory (OPT).” Although officially, Ben & Jerry’s belongs to Unilever, in truth, the company maintains its own policy when it comes to political issues. According to an essay in the Stanford Social Innovation Review, Cohen and Greenfield, the progressive Jews who founded the Vermont based company, “attempted to achieve [political autonomy] by negotiating the creation of…


A new law proposal in Israel wants to place face detecting cameras in public spaces. The goal of the initiative is to help police reduce crime and violence levels. On the other hand, human rights organizations say that such cameras severely breach people’s right to privacy since they’ll effectively allow police to track us anywhere.

When I was first told about the idea, my gut reaction was “So what?” And indeed, what can the state find about me, that I’m human? I admit that I don’t find it scary since I think this is how we have to relate to…


PA via Reuters People dancing in Bar Fibre in Leeds, after the final legal coronavirus restrictions were lifted in England at midnight. Picture date: Monday July 19, 2021.

Despite nearly 50,000 new confirmed cases daily and a rising pace of infection, despite 1,200 physicians backing a letter to The Lancet medical journal warning that “this decision is dangerous and premature,” and “provides fertile ground for the emergence of vaccine-resistant variants,” and a call “to pause plans to abandon mitigations on July 19, 2021,” the UK government went ahead with what was dubbed the “Freedom Day,” where nearly all Covid restrictions have been lifted. People in the UK are now permitted to cram bars, restaurants, entertainment halls, sports events, and gather however and wherever they want without any limits…


Wildfires in Russia’s Republic of Karelia

I am not afraid of the pandemic; I am afraid that nature has started to relate to us the way we relate to it. It seems as though chaos has taken over the world. Natural disasters of unprecedented magnitude are occurring in multiple places simultaneously: unheard-of floods in some places, unparalleled fires in other places, sometimes a few hundred miles apart, and scorching heat in still other places. At the same time, the coronavirus is spreading once again with the Delta variant, and threatens to hamper humanity’s efforts to recover from the pestilence, while international relations are growing increasingly tense…


A group of people pray together on the beach next to the site of the Champlain Towers South Condo in Surfside on Friday, June 25, 2021. Photo by Pedro Portal/Miami Herald/TNS/ABACAPRESS.COM

Physically, humans are very similar to other species of apes. In fact, we’re far less capable than other species: We’re much weaker, move slower, more susceptible to diseases, and we can’t climb trees. So how come we’ve become the “lords of the Earth?” The answer lies not in our abilities, but in a unique desire that only humans have: the desire to go beyond this world, the desire for the spiritual!

While the search for life’s purpose has developed us far beyond any other animal, it has also left us intensely frustrated. The inexplicable frenzy that the world seems to…

Michael Laitman

PhD in Philosophy and Kabbalah. MSc in Medical Bio-Cybernetics. Founder and president of Bnei Baruch Kabbalah Education & Research Institute.

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